John Wiley & Sons Artifictional Intelligence Cover For 70 years we have been arguing about whether computers will ever equal us in intelligence. Some g.. Product #: 978-1-5095-0411-4 Regular price: $61.59 $61.59 Auf Lager

Artifictional Intelligence

Against Humanity's Surrender to Computers

Collins, Harry

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1. Auflage Juli 2018
232 Seiten, Hardcover
Wiley & Sons Ltd

ISBN: 978-1-5095-0411-4
John Wiley & Sons

Kurzbeschreibung

For 70 years we have been arguing about whether computers will ever equal us in intelligence. Some gurus fear the 'Singularity', when computers will be so intelligent that they will enslave us - if we are lucky. But a greater danger is that we will enslave ourselves to stupid computers: the 'Surrender'. The recent startling successes in machine intelligence using a technique called 'deep learning' have given new urgency to this tension. Deep learning has put computers in touch with human culture as never before with dramatic results. Nevertheless, it is still impossible to foresee a time when machines will be sufficiently embedded in society to be independent of human input or when we cannot distinguish between the social and linguistic understanding of humans and computers. Fictional portrayals of intelligent machines simply confuse the issue.

Anyone can try the simple elements of a Turing test provided here: you can show that artificial intelligence is not as clever as it is said to be.

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For 70 years we have been arguing about whether computers will ever equal us in intelligence. Some gurus fear the 'Singularity', when computers will be so intelligent that they will enslave us - if we are lucky. But a greater danger is that we will enslave ourselves to stupid computers: the 'Surrender'. The recent startling successes in machine intelligence using a technique called 'deep learning' have given new urgency to this tension. Deep learning has put computers in touch with human culture as never before with dramatic results. Nevertheless, it is still impossible to foresee a time when machines will be sufficiently embedded in society to be independent of human input or when we cannot distinguish between the social and linguistic understanding of humans and computers. Fictional portrayals of intelligent machines simply confuse the issue.

Anyone can try the simple elements of a Turing test provided here: you can show that artificial intelligence is not as clever as it is said to be.

* Chapter 1. Computers in Social Life and the Danger of the 'Surrender'
* Chapter 2. Expertise and Writing about AI: Some Reflections on the Project
* Chapter 3. Language and 'Repair'
* Chapter 4. Humans, Social Contexts and Bodies
* Chapter 5. Six Levels of Artificial Intelligence
* Chapter 6. Deep Learning: Precedent-Based, Pattern-Recognising Computers
* Chapter 7. Kurzweil's Brain and the Sociology of Knowledge
* Chapter 8. How Humans Learn What Computers Can't
* Chapter 9. Two Models of Artificial Intelligence and the Way Forward
* Chapter 10. The Editing Test and Other New Versions of the Turing Test
* Appendix 1: How the Internet Works Today
* Appendix 2: Little Dogs
Harry Collins is a Fellow of the British Academy, and Distinguished Research Professor in the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University

H. Collins, Cardiff University