John Wiley & Sons Position, Navigation, and Timing Technologies in the 21st Century Cover Covers the latest developments in PNT technologies, including integrated satellite navigation, senso.. Product #: 978-1-119-45849-4 Regular price: $167.29 $167.29 Auf Lager

Position, Navigation, and Timing Technologies in the 21st Century

Integrated Satellite Navigation, Sensor Systems, and Civil Applications

Morton, Y. Jade / van Diggelen, Frank / Spilker, James J. / Parkinson, Bradford W. / Lo, Sherman / Gao, Grace (Herausgeber)

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1. Auflage März 2021
896 Seiten, Hardcover
Wiley & Sons Ltd

ISBN: 978-1-119-45849-4
John Wiley & Sons

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Covers the latest developments in PNT technologies, including integrated satellite navigation, sensor systems, and civil applications

Featuring sixty-four chapters that are divided into six parts, this two-volume work provides comprehensive coverage of the state-of-the-art in satellite-based position, navigation, and timing (PNT) technologies and civilian applications. It also examines alternative navigation technologies based on other signals-of-opportunity and sensors and offers a comprehensive treatment on integrated PNT systems for consumer and commercial applications.

Volume 1 of Position, Navigation, and Timing Technologies in the 21st Century: Integrated Satellite Navigation, Sensor Systems, and Civil Applications contains three parts and focuses on the satellite navigation systems, technologies, and engineering and scientific applications. It starts with a historical perspective of GPS development and other related PNT development. Current global and regional navigation satellite systems (GNSS and RNSS), their inter-operability, signal quality monitoring, satellite orbit and time synchronization, and ground- and satellite-based augmentation systems are examined. Recent progresses in satellite navigation receiver technologies and challenges for operations in multipath-rich urban environment, in handling spoofing and interference, and in ensuring PNT integrity are addressed. A section on satellite navigation for engineering and scientific applications finishes off the volume.

Volume 2 of Position, Navigation, and Timing Technologies in the 21st Century: Integrated Satellite Navigation, Sensor Systems, and Civil Applications consists of three parts and addresses PNT using alternative signals and sensors and integrated PNT technologies for consumer and commercial applications. It looks at PNT using various radio signals-of-opportunity, atomic clock, optical, laser, magnetic field, celestial, MEMS and inertial sensors, as well as the concept of navigation from Low-Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites. GNSS-INS integration, neuroscience of navigation, and animal navigation are also covered. The volume finishes off with a collection of work on contemporary PNT applications such as survey and mobile mapping, precision agriculture, wearable systems, automated driving, train control, commercial unmanned aircraft systems, aviation, and navigation in the unique Arctic environment.

In addition, this text:
* Serves as a complete reference and handbook for professionals and students interested in the broad range of PNT subjects
* Includes chapters that focus on the latest developments in GNSS and other navigation sensors, techniques, and applications
* Illustrates interconnecting relationships between various types of technologies in order to assure more protected, tough, and accurate PNT

Position, Navigation, and Timing Technologies in the 21st Century: Integrated Satellite Navigation, Sensor Systems, and Civil Applications will appeal to all industry professionals, researchers, and academics involved with the science, engineering, and applications of position, navigation, and timing technologies.

Part D: Position, Navigation, and Timing Using Radio Signals-of-Opportunity

35. Overview of Volume 2: Integrated PNT Technologies and Applications
John F. Raquet, Air Force Institute of Technology, US

36. Non-Linear Recursive Estimation for Integrated Navigation Systems
Michael J. Veth, Veth Research Associates, US

37. Overview of Indoor Navigation Techniques
Sudeep Pasricha, Colorado State University, US

38. Navigation with Cellular Signals-of-Opportunity
Zak Kassas, University of California Irvine, US

39. Navigation with Dedicated Metropolitan Beacon Systems
Subbu Meiyappan, NextNav LLC, US
Arun Raghupathy, NextNav LLC, US
Ganesh Pattabiraman, NextNav LLC, US

40. Navigation with Terrestrial Digital Broadcast Signals
Chun Yang, SigTem Technology Inc., US

41. Navigation with Low Frequency Radio Signals
Wouter Pelgrum, Blue Origin, US
Charles Schue, III, Ursa Nav., US

42. Adaptive Radar Navigation System
Kyle Kauffman, Air Force Institute of Technology, US

43. Navigation from Low Earth Orbit
Tyler G. R. Reid, Stanford University., US
Todd Walter, Stanford University, US
Per Enge, Stanford University, US
David Lawrence, Satelles, US
H. Stewart Cobb, Satelles, US
Greg Gutt, Satelles, US
Michael O'Conner, Satelles, US
David Whelan, University of California San Diego, US

Part E: Position, Navigation, and Timing Using Non-Radio Signals-of-Opportunity

44. Inertial Navigation Sensors
Stephen Smith, Draper Laboratory, US

45. MEMS Inertial Sensors
Alissa M. Fitzgerald, A.M. Fitzgerald & Associates, LLC, US

46. GNSS-INS Integration
Andrey Soloviev, QuNav, US
James L. Farrell, Vigil Inc., US
Maarten Uijt de Haag, Ohio University, US

47. Atomic Clock for GNSS
Leo Hollberg, Stanford University, US

48. Positioning Using Magnetic Fields
Aaron Canciani, Air Force Institute of Technology, US
John F. Raquet, Air Force Institute of Technology, US

49. Laser-Based Navigation
Maarten Uijt de Haag, Ohio University
Zhen Zhu, East Carolina University, US
Jacob Campbell, Air Force Research Laboratory, US

50. Image-Aided Navigation - Concept and Applications
Michael J. Veth, Veth Research Associates, US
John F. Raquet, Air Force Institute of Technology, US

51. Digital Photogrammetry
Charles Toth, the Ohio State University, US
Zoltan Koppanyi, the Ohio State University, US

52. Navigation Using Pulsars and Other Variable Celestial Sources
Suneel Sheikh, ASTER Labs, Inc., US

53. Neuroscience of Navigation
Meredith E. Minear, University of Wyoming, US
Tes K. Sensibaugh, University of Wyoming, US

54. Orientation and Navigation in the Animal World
Gillian Durieux, Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Germany
Miriam Liedvogel, Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Germany

Part F: Position, Navigation, and Timing for Consumer and Commercial Applications

55. GNSS Applications in Surveying and Mobile Mapping
Naser El-Sheimy, University of Calgary, Canada
Zahra Lari, University of Calgary, Canada

56. Precision Agriculture
Arthur F. Lange, Trimble Navigation, US
John Peake, Trimble Navigation, US

57. Wearables
Mark Gretton, TomTom, US
Peter Franks Pauwels, TomTom, US

58. Navigation in Advanced Driver-Assisted Systems and Automated Driving
David Bevly, Auburn University, US
Scott Martin, Auburn University, US

59. Train Control and Rail Traffic Management Systems
Alessandro Neri, University of Roma TRE, Italy

60. Commercial Unmanned Aircraft Systems
Maarten Uijt de Haag, Ohio University, US
Evan Dill, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, US
Steven D. Young, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, US
Mathieu Joerger, Virginia Tech, US

61. Navigation for Aviation
Sherman Lo, Stanford University, US

62. Orbit Determination with GNSS
Yoaz Bar-Sever, Jet Propulsion Lab, US

63. Satellite Formation Flying and Rendezvous
Simone D'Amico, Stanford University, US
J. Russell Carpenter, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, US

64. Navigation in the Arctic
Tyler G. R. Reid, Stanford University, US
Todd Walter, Stanford University, US
Robert Guinness, Finnish Geospatial Research Institute, Finland
Sarang Thombre, Finnish Geospatial Research Institute, Finland
Heidi Kuusniemi, Finnish Geospatial Research Institute, Finland
Norvald Kjerstad, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
Y. Jade Morton, PhD is a Professor at Ann and H. J. Smead Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department, University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests lie at the intersection of satellite navigation and remote sensing of the space environment, atmosphere, and Earth surface. She has led numerous research projects sponsored by AFOSR, AFRL, DARPA, NASA, NSF, ONR, and private industries. Dr. Morton is the President of the Institute of Navigation (ION), a fellow of IEEE, ION, and the Royal Institute of Navigation (RIN, UK).

Frank Van Diggelen, PhD is a Principal Engineer at Google, where he leads the Android Core-Location Team. He also teaches at Stanford University. He is the inventor of coarse-time GNSS navigation, co-inventor of Long Term Orbits for A-GNSS, and the author of A-GPS the first textbook on Assisted GNSS. He is Executive Vice President of the Institute of Navigation (ION) and a Fellow of the ION and the Royal Institute of Navigation (UK).

James J. Spilker, Jr., PhD was a Consulting Professor in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department at Stanford University. Dr. Spilker was an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Life Fellow of the IEEE, and a Fellow of the Institute of Navigation (ION). As one of the originators of GPS, James Spilker shared the Goddard Memorial Trophy and the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering.

Bradford W. Parkinson, PhD is an Edward C. Wells Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics Emeritus at Stanford University. Dr. Parkinson was the Chief Architect for GPS, led the original advocacy and development for the system, and served as the first Director of the GPS Joint Program Office. He has been the CEO of two companies and serves on many boards. Among his many awards are the IEEE Medal of Honor, the Draper Prize of the National Academy of Engineering, and the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering.

Y. J. Morton, University of Colorado Boulder; F. van Diggelen, Google; J. J. Spilker, Stanford University; B. W. Parkinson, Stanford University; S. Lo, Stanford University; G. Gao, Stanford University