John Wiley & Sons Sustainable Management for Managers and Engineers Cover In a competitive and complex world, where requirements from different fields are ever-growing, organ.. Product #: 978-1-78630-439-1 Regular price: $142.06 $142.06 Auf Lager

Sustainable Management for Managers and Engineers

Machado, Carolina / Davim, J. Paulo (Herausgeber)

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1. Auflage März 2021
304 Seiten, Hardcover
Wiley & Sons Ltd

ISBN: 978-1-78630-439-1
John Wiley & Sons

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In a competitive and complex world, where requirements from different fields are ever-growing, organizations need to be responsible for their actions in their respective markets. However, this responsibility must not be deemed one-time-only but instead should be seen as a continuous process, under which organizations ought to effectively use the different resources to allow them to meet the present and future requirements of their stakeholders. Having a significant influence on their collaborators? performance, the role developed by managers and engineers is highly relevant to the sustainability of an organization?s success. Conscious of this reality, this book contributes to the exchange of experiences and perspectives on the state of research related to sustainable management. Particular focus is given to the role that needs to be developed by managers and engineers, as well as to the future direction of this field of research.

Preface xi
Carolina Feliciana MACHADO and J. Paulo DAVIM

Chapter 1. Choice Architecture: Nudging for Sustainable Behavior 1
Cristiana Cerqueira LEAL and Benilde OLIVEIRA

1.1. Choice architecture and nudging 1

1.1.1. Choice architecture 1

1.1.2. Nudging: using choice architecture for good 2

1.2. Theoretical roots and applications around the word 4

1.2.1. Heuristics and systematic errors 4

1.2.2. Libertarian paternalism 5

1.2.3. Pro-self and pro-society nudges 5

1.2.4. Nudging around the world 6

1.3. Nudging for sustainability 8

1.3.1. Nudging tools for sustainable behavior 8

1.3.2. Behavioral insights 9

1.4. Challenges and final remarks 15

1.5. References 16

Chapter 2. Embedding Corporate Sustainability in Human Resource Management Practice 19
David STARR-GLASS

2.1. Introduction 19

2.2. Corporate social responsibility and corporate sustainability 21

2.2.1. Corporate social responsibility 21

2.2.2. Corporate sustainability 24

2.3. Human resource management 26

2.3.1. A short evolutionary history of HRM 26

2.4. The nexus of human resource management and corporate sustainability 28

2.4.1. Instrumental CSR-HRM 29

2.4.2. Social integrative CSR-HRM 30

2.4.3. Political CSR-HRM 32

2.5. Embedding corporate sustainability in HRM practices 33

2.5.1. Recruitment and selection practices 33

2.5.2. Training and development practices 35

2.5.3. Motivation, performance and appraisal 37

2.5.4. Rewards, compensation and benefits 38

2.6. Conclusion 40

2.7. References 42

Chapter 3. Competency Cultivation of Mechanical Engineers in the Process of Social Sustainable Development 53
Hailong FU, Yue WANG, Marius Gabriel PETRESCU and Mirela PANAIT

3.1. The importance of the basic qualities of mechanical engineers for the sustainable development of society 53

3.1.1. What are the basic qualities of a mechanical engineer? 53

3.1.2. How to achieve sustainable development of mechanical engineers 54

3.1.3. The relationship between the sustainable development of mechanical engineers and the sustainable development of society 54

3.2. Mechanical engineers must observe ethics and laws 55

3.2.1. The importance of engineering ethics 56

3.2.2. Problems and causes of engineering ethics 56

3.2.3. Legal issues in manufacturing 56

3.3. Mechanical engineers shoulder responsibility for environmental protection 57

3.3.1. Environmental pollution from industrial production is widespread 57

3.3.2. Engineers should know how to control industrial environmental pollution 58

3.4. Mechanical engineers must be familiar with traditions and learn to innovate 59

3.5. Mechanical engineers should pay attention to product quality management and quality assurance systems 60

3.6. Mechanical engineers should have a time view, a cost view and a risk view 61

3.6.1. Establish the concept of time, follow the trend of industry development 62

3.6.2. Set up the cost view, strengthen the core competition ability 62

3.6.3. Establish the concept of project risk to avoid the occurrence of major losses 62

3.7. Mechanical engineers should have a global vision 62

3.7.1. Establish a system concept and give play to the role of system engineering 62

3.7.2. Strengthen international exchanges and promote common progress within the industry 63

3.8. Conclusion 63

3.9. Acknowledgements 64

3.10. References 64

Chapter 4. Essentials of Sustainability: A Roadmap for Businesses 67
Yasemin SEN

4.1. Introduction 67

4.2. Definition of sustainability 67

4.3. History of sustainability 69

4.4. Sustainability entrepreneurship 70

4.5. Sustainable business 76

4.6. Sustainability leadership and culture 83

4.7. Sustainability innovation 85

4.8. Conclusion 86

4.9. References 86

Chapter 5. Styles of Leadership and Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility 89
Adriana Toledo PEREIRA, Maria João SANTOS and Dimas de Oliveira ESTEVAM

5.1. Introduction 89

5.2. Styles of leadership and SR perceptions 90

5.2.1. Styles of leadership: transformational, transactional and laissez-faire 90

5.2.2. SR perceptions 91

5.2.3. Relationships between styles of leadership and SR 92

5.2.4. Research model and hypotheses 93

5.3. Method 95

5.4. Results 96

5.4.1. Analysis of scale reliability 96

5.4.2. Mean and standard sample deviation 96

5.4.3. Analysis of variable correlations 97

5.4.4. Multiple regression analysis 98

5.5. Discussion of the results 99

5.6. Conclusion 101

5.7. References 103

Chapter 6. Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting: Background, Evolution and Sustainability Promoter 109
Marian Cátálin VOICA and Adrian STANCU

6.1. Introduction 109

6.2. A brief history of CSR development and conceptualization 110

6.2.1. Timeline of CSR development 110

6.2.2. Opponents and supporters of CSR 111

6.2.3. Carroll's pyramid of corporate social responsibility 112

6.2.4. The three-domain model of CSR 114

6.3. Corporate social reporting - standardization and policy 116

6.3.1. Corporate social reporting standards 116

6.3.2. Corporate social reporting policy 117

6.3.3. Carrots and sticks analysis 118

6.4. Analysis of the GRI reporting enterprises between 2007 and 2017 120

6.4.1. Analysis of the GRI reporting enterprises from the energy sector between 2007 and 2017 121

6.4.2. Analysis of the GRI reporting enterprises from the chemicals sector between 2007 and 2017 127

6.4.3. Analysis of the GRI reporting enterprises from the metal products sector between 2007 and 2017 133

6.4.4. Analysis of the GRI reporting enterprises from the mining sector between 2007 and 2017 139

6.4.5. Analysis of the GRI reporting enterprises from the automotive sector between 2007 and 2017 145

6.5. Conclusion 151

6.6. References 153

Chapter 7. Integrated Management Systems Under the Banner of Sustainable Development: Risks and Opportunities 157
Marius Gabriel PETRESCU, Mirela PANAIT and Hailong FU

7.1. Introduction 157

7.1.1. Organizations and sustainable development 157

7.1.2. Integrated management systems in the context of sustainable development 162

7.2. Evolution of approaches for management systems 166

7.2.1. Quality and quality management system 166

7.2.2. The environment and the environmental management system 172

7.2.3. Occupational safety and health management system 178

7.3. Conclusion 181

7.4. References 182

Chapter 8. Mentoring... Really? And Why Not? 189
Bruna ROCHA, João Leite RIBEIRO and Delfina GOMES

8.1. Introduction 189

8.2. Concept of mentoring 191

8.2.1. Development of the mentoring concept 191

8.2.2. Mentoring, the concept 193

8.2.3. Types of mentoring 197

8.2.4. Mentoring objectives 199

8.2.5. Mentoring participants 201

8.2.6. Advantages and disadvantages of mentoring 204

8.2.7. Mentoring: facilitators and obstacles 211

8.3. Conclusion 218

8.4. References 219

Chapter 9. Stop Camouflaging it in Green: Do Not Confuse Corporate Social Responsibility with Sustainable Management 225
Diana FERNANDES and Carolina Feliciana MACHADO

9.1. Introduction 226

9.2. Ecological Economics 229

9.3. Sustainable Management 233

9.4. Corporate Social Responsibility 237

9.5. Where do the concepts match and mismatch? 243

9.6. Conclusion 248

9.7. References 250

List of Authors 261

Index 263
Carolina Machado is Associate Professor at the University of Minho, Portugal, Head of the Department of Management and Head of the Human Resources Work Group. Her research interests include human resource management, training and development, emotional intelligence, management change, knowledge management and management/HRM in the digital age. J. Paulo Davim is Full Professor at the University of Aveiro, Portugal, and a Fellow (FIET) of The Institution of Engineering and Technology, UK. His research interests include manufacturing, materials and mechanical and industrial engineering, management, engineering education and higher education for sustainability.

J. P. Davim, University of Aveiro, PORTUGAL