John Wiley & Sons Geomorphology and the Carbon Cycle Cover Geomorphology and the Carbon Cycle is the first systematic examination of the role of geomorphologic.. Product #: 978-1-119-39321-4 Regular price: $69.07 $69.07 In Stock

Geomorphology and the Carbon Cycle

Evans, Martin

RGS-IBG Book Series

Cover

1. Edition March 2022
304 Pages, Hardcover
Wiley & Sons Ltd

ISBN: 978-1-119-39321-4
John Wiley & Sons

Short Description

Geomorphology and the Carbon Cycle is the first systematic examination of the role of geomorphological processes in the cycling of carbon through the terrestrial system. Through a systematic analysis of the sediment cascade it argues that knowledge of geomorphological processes is fundamental to understanding the ways in which carbon is stored and recycled in the terrestrial environment. The book integrates classical geomorphological theory with understanding of microbial processes controlling the decomposition of organic matter to develop an interdisciplinary research agenda for the analysis of the terrestrial carbon cycle. The book develops a conceptual framework based on geomorphological understanding, and informed by work in ecology, microbiology and biogeochemistry, in order to analyse spatial and temporal patterns of terrestrial carbon cycling at the landscape scale. It also considers the ways in which, as Humanity enters the Anthropocene, the application of this science has the potential to manage the terrestrial carbon cycle to limit increases in atmospheric carbon.

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The first systematic examination of the role of geomorphological processes in the cycling of carbon through the terrestrial system.
* Argues that knowledge of geomorphological processes is fundamental to understanding the ways in which carbon is stored and recycled in the terrestrial environment
* Integrates classical geomorphological theory with understanding of microbial processes controlling the decomposition of organic matter
* Develops an interdisciplinary research agenda for the analysis of the terrestrial carbon cycle
* Informed by work in ecology, microbiology and biogeochemistry, in order to analyse spatial and temporal patterns of terrestrial carbon cycling at the landscape scale
* Considers the ways in which, as Humanity enters the Anthropocene, the application of this science has the potential to manage the terrestrial carbon cycle to limit increases in atmospheric carbon

Contents


Series Editors' Preface viii


Acknowledgements ix


Part I The Terrestrial Carbon Cycle and Geomorphological Theory 1


1 Geomorphology and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle 3


2 Geomorphology and the Fast Carbon Cycle 12


3 Geomorphology and the Geological Carbon Cycle 37


4 Geomorphological Theory and Practice: Material Fluxes in the
Terrestrial Carbon Cycle 53


Part II Geomorphology and Carbon Cycling Across the
Sediment Cascade 77


5 Carbon Cycling in Headwater Catchments 79


6 Hillslope Soil Erosion and Terrestrial Carbon Cycling 110


7 The Role of Floodplains in Terrestrial Carbon Cycling 136


8 Geomorphology and Carbon Cycling in the Coastal Ecotone 167


Part III A Geomorphological Approach to the Carbon Cycle 191


9 Geomorphology and Carbon Cycling in the Anthropocene 193


10 Towards a Geomorphologically Informed Model of Terrestrial
Carbon Cycling 218


References 240


Index 287
'An outstanding and timely book, which claims centre stage for geomorphology in an analysis of one of the key themes of Earth System Science - the global carbon cycle. Professor Evans writes persuasively and thoughtfully, weaving together geomorphic theory with a broad-ranging review of empirical evidence to produce a convincing perspective on current trends as well as an agenda for future research.'
Heather A. Viles, Professor of Biogeomorphology and Heritage Conservation, University of Oxford and President, British Society for Geomorphology


'Carbon is moving all around us. Some of these flows of carbon are linked to physical processes that weather, erode and shape the landscape, requiring us to make the link between geomorphology and biogeochemistry to understand them. This timely book, written by an expert in the role of erosion on peatland soil, details how geomorphic processes impact the carbon cycle. It considers this over millions of year timescale, up to the present day, where humans have modified these carbon transfers. It would make an excellent introduction to the subject for courses in geography and earth sciences, while also providing rich detail and case-studies of erosion and carbon from mountainous uplands to coastal ecosystems for advanced researchers.'
Professor Robert Hilton, Department of Geography, Durham University
Martin Evans is Professor of Geomorphology at the University of Manchester, UK. He has studied physical geography at Oxford and the University of British Columbia, and worked at the University of Durham before coming to Manchester. His research focusses on the application of geomorphological and hydrological knowledge, to understanding the terrestrial carbon cycle and wider ecosystem services, with a particular interest in peatland systems.

M. Evans, University of Manchester, UK