John Wiley & Sons Telemedicine Technologies Cover Since the launch of Telemedicine Technologies (Wiley, 2010), the technologies surrounding telemedici.. Product #: 978-1-119-57574-0 Regular price: $113.33 $113.33 Auf Lager

Telemedicine Technologies

Information Technologies in Medicine and Digital Health

Fong, Bernard / Fong, A. C. M. / Li, C. K.

Cover

2. Auflage Juli 2020
320 Seiten, Hardcover
Fachbuch

ISBN: 978-1-119-57574-0
John Wiley & Sons

Jetzt kaufen

Preis: 119,00 €

Preis inkl. MwSt, zzgl. Versand

Weitere Versionen

epubmobipdf

Since the launch of Telemedicine Technologies (Wiley, 2010), the technologies surrounding telemedicine have changed immeasurably, particularly with the emerging trends of Internet-of-Things (IoT), digital/e-Health, and wearable, smart and assistive technologies. This second edition overhauls and expands on the original text to reflect the technical advances of the last decade. It covers applications from traditional healthcare services to remote patient monitoring and recovery, to alternative medicine and general health assessment for maintaining optimal health. This welcome update brings together a broad range of topics demonstrating how information and wireless technologies can be used in healthcare.

Foreword xi

Preface xiii

Acknowledgments xv

About the Book xvii

Book Overview xix

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Information Technology and Healthcare Professionals 1

1.2 Providing Healthcare to Patients 2

1.2.1 Technical Perspectives 4

1.2.2 Healthcare Providers 5

1.2.3 End Users 5

1.2.4 Authorities 6

1.3 Healthcare Informatics Developments 6

1.4 Different Definitions of Telemedicine 8

1.5 The Growth of E-health to M-health 11

1.5.1 Evolving from the Internet 11

1.5.2 Digital Health on the Move 12

1.5.3 Data is Sent as a Sequence of "Packets" 13

1.6 The Connected World Between Human and Devices 14

References 14

2 Communication Networks and Services 17

2.1 The Basics of Wireless Communications 17

2.1.1 Wired vs. Wireless 19

2.1.2 Conducting vs. Optical Cables 20

2.1.3 Data Transmission Speed 22

2.1.4 Electromagnetic Interference 23

2.1.5 Modulation 23

2.2 Types of Wireless Networks 24

2.2.1 Bluetooth 24

2.2.2 Infrared (IR) 25

2.2.3 Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) and Wi-Fi 25

2.2.4 ZigBee 26

2.2.5 Li-Fi 26

2.2.6 Cellular Networks 26

2.2.7 Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) 28

2.2.8 Satellite Networks 29

2.2.9 Licensed and Unlicensed Frequency Bands 29

2.3 M-health and Telemedicine Applications 29

2.4 The Outdoor Operating Environment 30

2.5 RFID in Telemedicine 35

References 38

3 Information and Communications Technology in Health Monitoring 41

3.1 Body Area Networks 42

3.2 Emergency Rescue 44

3.2.1 At the Scene 45

3.2.2 Smart Ambulance 47

3.2.3 Network Backbone 49

3.2.4 At the Hospital 50

3.2.5 The Authority 50

3.3 Remote Recovery 51

3.3.1 At Sea 51

3.3.2 Forests and Mountains 52

3.3.3 Buildings on Fire 53

3.4 Smart Hospital 55

3.4.1 Radiology Detects Cancer and Abnormality 56

3.4.2 Robot Assisted Telesurgery 58

3.4.3 Ward Management Using RFID 59

3.4.4 Electromagnetic Interference on Medical Instrument 61

3.4.5 Smart Wearable Integration 61

3.5 General Health Assessments 61

3.5.1 Case Study I: Fitness Monitoring for a Morning Jog 62

3.5.2 Case Study II: Gym Workout 63

3.5.3 Case Study III: Swimming 64

3.6 Multisensory Stimulation for Aging Care 66

References 68

4 Data Analytics and Medical Information Processing 71

4.1 Noninvasive Health Data Collection 72

4.1.1 Body Temperature 73

4.1.2 Heart Rate 75

4.1.3 Blood Pressure 78

4.1.4 Respiration Rate 80

4.1.5 Blood Oxygen Saturation 81

4.1.6 Blood Glucose Concentration 83

4.2 Biosignal Transmission and Processing 83

4.2.1 Medical Imaging 84

4.2.1.1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging 85

4.2.1.2 X-ray 85

4.2.1.3 Ultrasound 89

4.2.2 Medical Image Transmission and Analysis 90

4.2.3 Image Compression 93

4.2.4 Biopotential Electrode Sensing 94

4.3 Patient Records and Data Mining Applications 98

4.4 Knowledge Management for Clinical Applications 101

4.5 Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Digital Health 104

4.5.1 Deep Learning 106

4.5.2 AI in Mobile Health 107

4.5.3 Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) 109

4.5.4 Electronic Drug Store 110

References 111

5 Wireless Telemedicine System Deployment 115

5.1 Planning and Deployment Considerations 116

5.1.1 The OSI Model 117

5.1.2 Site Survey 119

5.1.3 Standalone Ad Hoc Versus Centrally Coordinated Networks 120

5.1.4 Link Budget Evaluation 121

5.1.5 Antenna Placement 122

5.2 Scalability to Support Future Growth 123

5.2.1 Modulation 124

5.2.2 Cellular Configuration 125

5.2.3 Multiple Access 127

5.2.4 Orthogonal Polarization 130

5.3 Integration with Existing IT Infrastructure 132

5.3.1 Middleware 133

5.3.2 Database 133

5.3.3 Involving Different People 134

5.4 Evaluating an IT Service and Solution Provider 135

5.4.1 Outsourcing 135

5.4.2 Preparing for the Future 136

5.4.3 Reliability and Liability 136

5.5 Quality Assurance 138

5.6 IoT and Cloud Integration 140

5.6.1 IoT in Telemedicine 140

5.6.2 Patient Location Tracking 142

5.6.3 Cloud for Patients and Practitioners 144

References 145

6 Safeguarding Medical Data and Privacy 147

6.1 Information Security Overview 147

6.1.1 What are the Risks? 148

6.1.2 Computer Viruses 151

6.1.3 Security Devices 152

6.1.4 Security Management 152

6.2 Cryptography 154

6.2.1 Certificate 155

6.2.2 Symmetric Cryptography 156

6.2.3 Asymmetric Cryptography 156

6.2.4 Digital Signature 158

6.3 Safeguarding Patient Medical History 159

6.3.1 National Electronic Patient Record 159

6.3.2 Personal Controlled Health Record (PCHR) 160

6.3.3 Patients' Concerns 161

6.4 Anonymous Data Collection and Processing 161

6.4.1 Information Sharing Between Different Authorities and Agencies 162

6.4.2 Disease Control 164

6.4.3 Policy Planning 166

6.5 Biometric Security and Identification 169

6.5.1 Fingerprint Recognition 170

6.5.2 Palmprint Recognition 172

6.5.3 Iris and Retina Recognition 174

6.5.4 Facial Recognition 176

6.5.5 Voice Recognition 177

6.6 Conclusion 178

References 179

7 Information Technology in Alternative Medicine 183

7.1 Technology for Natural Healing and Preventive Care 184

7.1.1 Acupuncture and Acupressure 184

7.1.2 Body Contour and Acupoints 186

7.1.3 Temporary On-scene Relief Treatment Support 188

7.1.4 Herbal Medicine 190

7.2 Interactive Gaming for Healthcare 191

7.2.1 Games and Physical Exercise: eSport 191

7.2.2 Monitoring and Optimizing Children's Health 191

7.2.3 Wireless Control Technology 193

7.3 Consumer Electronics in Healthcare 194

7.3.1 Assortment of Consumer Appliances 195

7.3.2 Safety and Design Considerations 196

7.3.3 Marketing Myths, What Something Claims to Achieve 197

7.4 Telehealth in General Healthcare and Fitness 197

7.4.1 Technology Assisted Exercise 198

7.4.2 In the Gym 199

7.4.3 Continual Health Assessment 200

References 201

8 Digital Health for Community Care 205

8.1 Telecare 205

8.1.1 Telehealth 206

8.1.2 Equipment 207

8.1.3 Sensory Therapy 209

8.1.4 Are we Ready? 209

8.1.5 Liability 210

8.2 Safeguarding Senior Citizens and the Aging Population 210

8.2.1 Telecare for Senior Citizens 212

8.2.2 The User Interface 217

8.2.3 Active Versus Responsive 219

8.2.4 Supporting Independent Living 220

8.3 Telemedicine in Physiotherapy 221

8.3.1 Movement Detection 221

8.3.2 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 224

8.3.3 Active Prevention 224

8.4 Healthcare Access for Rural Areas 226

8.5 Healthcare Technology and the Environment 228

8.5.1 A Long History 229

8.5.2 Energy Conservation and Safety 231

8.5.3 Medical Radiation: Risks, Myths, and Misperceptions 232

References 235

9 Wearable Healthcare 239

9.1 From Mobile to Wearable 239

9.1.1 Size Matters 239

9.1.2 Continuous Versus Continual Monitoring 242

9.1.3 Wearable Monitoring for Everyone 243

9.2 Medical Devices Versus Consumer Electronics Gadgets 245

9.2.1 Definition of Medical Devices 245

9.2.2 Device Classification 246

9.3 Connectivity 248

9.3.1 Deployment Options 248

9.3.2 Connectivity for Quality Monitoring 249

9.4 Enhancing Caring Efficiency 249

9.4.1 Mobility Assistance 250

9.4.2 Preparation for an Emergency Situation: A Case Study of a Nursing Home 251

9.5 Wearable Physiotherapy 252

References 253

10 Smart and Assistive Technologies 257

10.1 Affordability in Assistive Technologies 257

10.1.1 Assistive Technology Becomes Affordable 257

10.1.2 Connecting People and Machines 258

10.1.3 Emotional Intelligence: Remaining Happy and Healthy 258

10.2 Smart Home Integration 259

10.2.1 Consumer Electronics in the Home Setting 259

10.2.2 Integrating Healthcare and Lifestyle into the Home 260

10.3 Digital Health in Improving Treatment 261

10.3.1 Treatment Innovations 261

10.3.2 Smart Pills 263

10.4 Prognostics in Telemedicine 265

10.4.1 Smart Network Management in Telemedicine 265

10.4.2 Self-calibration 269

10.5 Clothing Technology in Telehealth 270

10.5.1 Self-powered Devices 271

10.5.2 Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring Wristband: A Case Study 272

References 273

11 Future Trends in Healthcare Technology 277

11.1 Haptic Sensing for Practitioners 277

11.2 Business Intelligence in Healthcare Prevention 278

11.2.1 Medical Tourism 279

11.2.2 Cyber Physical Systems 279

11.3 Cross-border Care: A Case Study of Syndromic Surveillance 282

11.4 5G-basedWireless Telemedicine 283

11.4.1 5G and IoT to Tackle DCD: A Case Study 285

11.4.2 Faster Wireless Communications for Supporting Virtual Reality (VR) in Telemedicine 285

11.5 The Future of Telemedicine and Information Technology for Everyone: From Newborn to Becoming a Medical Professional all the Way Through to Retirement 286

References 290

Index 293
Bernard Fong is currently with Providence University, Taiwan. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology and Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of New South Wales in 1993 and 2005, respectively.

A. C. M. Fong is currently with Western Michigan University, USA. He graduated from Imperial College London and the University of Oxford, UK.

C. K. Li is currently with Alpha Positive Clinic, Hong Kong. He received his MSc degree from the University of London and PhD degree from the University of Westminster, UK.

B. Fong, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand