Wiley-VCH, Weinheim Flexible and Wearable Electronics for Smart Clothing Cover Provides the state-of-the-art on wearable technology for smart clothing The book gives a coheren.. Product #: 978-3-527-34534-2 Regular price: $141.90 $141.90 Auf Lager

Flexible and Wearable Electronics for Smart Clothing

Wang, Gang / Hou, Chengyi / Wang, Hongzhi (Herausgeber)

Cover

1. Auflage April 2020
XIV, 346 Seiten, Hardcover
9 Tabellen
Monographie

ISBN: 978-3-527-34534-2
Wiley-VCH, Weinheim

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Provides the state-of-the-art on wearable technology for smart clothing

The book gives a coherent overview of recent development on flexible electronics for smart clothing with emphasis on wearability and durability of the materials and devices. It offers detailed information on the basic functional components of the flexible and wearable electronics including sensing, systems-on-a-chip, interacting, and energy, as well as the integrating and connecting of electronics into textile form. It also provides insights into the compatibility and integration of functional materials, electronics, and the clothing technology.

Flexible and Wearable Electronics for Smart Clothing offers comprehensive coverage of the technology in four parts. The first part discusses wearable organic nano-sensors, stimuli-responsive electronic skins, and flexible thermoelectrics and thermoelectric textiles. The next part examines textile triboelectric nanogenerators for energy harvesting, flexible and wearable solar cells and supercapacitors, and flexible and wearable lithium-ion batteries. Thermal and humid management for next-generation textiles, functionalization of fiber materials for washable smart wearable textiles, and flexible microfluidics for wearable electronics are covered in the next section. The last part introduces readers to piezoelectric materials and devices based flexible bio-integrated electronics, printed electronics for smart clothes, and the materials and processes for stretchable and wearable e-textile devices.

-Presents the most recent developments in wearable technology such as wearable nanosensors, logic circuit, artificial intelligence, energy harvesting, and wireless communication
-Covers the flexible and wearable electronics as essential functional components for smart clothing from sensing, systems-on-a-chip, interacting, energy to the integrating and connecting of electronics
-Of high interest to a large and interdisciplinary target group, including materials scientists, textile chemists, and electronic engineers in academia and industry

Flexible and Wearable Electronics for Smart Clothing will appeal to materials scientists, textile industry professionals, textile engineers, electronics engineers, and sensor developers.

PREFACE
PART I SENSING
1 WEARABLE ORGANIC NANO-SENSORS,
1.2 Wearable organic sensors based on different device architectures 4
1.2.1 Resistor based Sensors 5
1.2.1.1 Definitions and important parameters 5
1.2.1.2 Materials and applications 5
1.2.2 Organic Field Effect Transistor based Sensors 13
1.2.2.1 Definitions and important parameters 13
1.2.2.2 Strategy and applications 13
1.2.3 Electrochemical Sensors 20
1.2.3.1 Definitions and important parameters 20
1.2.3.2 Strategy and applications 20
1.2.4 Diode based Sensors 23
1.2.4.1 Definitions and important parameters 23
1.2.4.2 Strategy and applications 24
1.2.5 Other devices and system integration 25
1.3 Summary and perspective 29
Reference 30

2 STIMULI-RESPONSIVE ELECTRONIC SKINS,
2.1 Introduction 37
2.2 Materials for Electronic Skins 37
2.2.1 Liquid metals 38
2.2.2 Hydrogels 39
2.2.3 Ionogels 41
2.2.4 Elastomers 42
2.2.5 Conductive polymers 42
2.2.6 Inorganic materials 43
2.3 Stimuli-responsive behaviors 45
2.3.1 Electrical signals in response to environmental stimuli 45
2.3.2 Stimuli-responsive self-healing 48
2.3.3 Stimuli-responsive optical appearances 50
2.3.4 Stimuli-responsive actuations 52
2.3.5 Improved processability based on the stimuli-responsive behaviors 53
2.4 Mechanism understanding for stimuli-responsive materials applied for electronic skins 54
2.5 Conclusion 59
References 60

3 FLEXIBLE THERMOELECTRICS AND THERMOELECTRIC TEXTILES,
3.1 Introduction 68
3.2 Thermoelectricity and Thermoelectric Materials 68
3.3 Thermoelectric Generators 73
3.4 Wearable Thermoelectric Generators for Smart Clothing 75
3.4.1 Flexible Thermoelectric 77
3.4.2 Organic thermoelectric materials related 80
3.4.3 Carbon-based thermoelectric materials related 81
3.4.4 Fiber and Textile Related Thermoelectrics 83
3.5 Prospects and Challenges 87
References 89

PART II ENERGY
4 TEXTILE TRIBOELECTRIC NANOGENERATORS FOR ENERGY HARVESTING
4.1 Introduction 98
4.2 Fundamentals of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) 99
4.2.2 Four working modes 101
4.2.3 Materials for TENGs 102
4.3 Progresses of textile TENGs 103
4.3.1 Materials for textile TENGs 103
4.3.2 Fabrication processes for textile TENGs 104
4.3.3 Structures of textile TENGs 106
4.3.4 Washing capability 114
4.3.5 Self-charging power textiles 115
4.4 Conclusions and perspectives 116
References 117

5 FLEXIBLE AND WEARABLE SOLAR CELLS AND SUPERCAPACITORS,
5.1 Introduction 120
5.2 Flexible and Wearable Solar Cells 120
5.2.1 Flexible and Wearable Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells 121
5.2.2 Flexible and Wearable Polymer Solar Cells 127
5.2.3 Flexible and Wearable Perovskite Solar Cells 137
5.2.4 Flexible and Wearable Supercapacitors 146
5.2.5 Flexible and Wearable electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) 150
5.2.6 Flexible and Wearable Pseudocapacitor 154
5.2.7 Integrated Solar Cells and Supercapacitors 159
5.3 Conclusions and Outlook 164
Acknowledgements 165
References 166

6 FLEXIBLE AND WEARABLE LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES,
6.1 Introduction 183
6.2 Typical lithium-ion batteries 183
6.3 Electrodes materials for flexible lithium-ion batteries 185
6.3.1 Three-dimensional (3D) electrodes 185
6.3.2 Two-dimensional (2D) electrodes 187
6.3.3 One-dimensional (1D) electrodes 197
6.4 Flexible lithium-ion batteries based on electrolytes 199
6.4.1 Liquid-state electrolytes 199
6.4.2 Solid-state electrolytes 202
6.5 Inactive materials and components of flexible LIBs 207
6.5.1 Separators 207
6.5.2 Casing/packaging 212
6.5.3 Current collectors 214
6.5.4 Electrode additive materials 215
6.6 Conclusions and prospects 216
References 218
PART III INTERACTING
7 THERMAL AND HUMID MANAGEMENT FOR NEXT-GENERATION TEXTILES
7.1 Introduction 231
7.2 Passive smart materials 232
7.3 Energy harvest materials 238
7.4 Active smart materials 245
7.5 Conclusion 249
References 249
8 FUNCTIONALIZATION OF FIBER MATERIALS FOR WASHABLE SMART WEARABLE TEXTILES
8.1 Introduction 253
8.1.1 Conductive textiles 253
8.1.2 Waterproof conductive textiles 254
8.1.3 Washable conductive textiles 255
8.1.4 Evaluation of washable conductive textiles 255
8.2 Fiber materials functionalization for conductivity 255
8.2.1 Conductive fiber substrates based on polymer materials 255
8.2.1.1 Dip Coating 256
8.2.1.2 Graft modification 258
8.2.1.3 In situ chemical polymerization 260
8.2.1.4 Electrochemical polymerization 260
8.2.1.5 In situ vapor phase polymerization 261
8.2.2 Conductive fiber substrates based on metal materials 263
8.2.2.1 Electroless plating 263
8.2.2.2 Metal conductive ink printing 267
8.2.3 Conductive fiber substrates based on carbon material 269
8.2.3.1 Vacuum filtration 269
8.2.3.2 Dip-coating 270
8.2.3.3 Printing 272
8.2.3.4 Dyeing 273
8.2.3.5 Ultrasonic depositing 274
8.2.3.6 Brushing coating 275
8.2.4 Conductive fiber substrates based on graphene composite materials 275
8.2.4.1 Dip-coating 275
8.2.4.2 In situ polymerization 276
8.3 Waterproof modification for conductive fiber substrates 277
8.3.1 Dip-coating method 278
8.3.2 Sol-gel method 279
8.3.3 Chemical vapor deposition 279
8.4 Washing evaluations of conductive textiles 280
8.5 Conclusions 283
References 283

9 FLEXIBLE MICROFLUIDICS FOR WEARABLE ELECTRONICS,
9.1 Introduction 290
9.2 Materials 290
9.3 Fabrication Technologies 292
9.3.1 Layer Transfer and Lamination 292
9.3.2 Soft Lithography 294
9.3.3 Inkjet Printing 295
9.3.4 3D Printing 296
9.3.5 Fabrication of Open-surface Microfluidics 298
9.4 Applications 301
9.4.1 Wearable microfluidics for sweat-based biosensing 302
9.4.2 Wearable microfluidics for ISF-based biosensing 305
9.4.3 Wearable microfluidics for motion sensing 308
9.4.4 Other flexible microfluidics 308
9.5 Challenges 313
References 315

PART V INTEGRATING AND CONNECTING
10 PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIALS AND DEVICES BASED FLEXIBLE BIO-INTEGRATED ELECTRONICS,
10.1 Introduction 319
10.2 Piezoelectric materials 320
10.3 Piezoelectric devices for biomedical applications 323
10.4 Conclusion 330
References 330

11 PRINTED ELECTRONICS FOR SMART CLOTHES,
11.1 Introduction 337
11.2 Printing technology 337
11.2.1 Non-template printing 337
11.2.2 Template-based printing 340
11.3 Flexible Substrates 342
11.3.1 Commercially Available Polymers 343
11.3.1.1 Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) 343
11.3.1.2 Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) 344
11.3.1.3 Polyimide (PI) 346
11.3.1.4 Polyurethane (PU) 347
11.3.1.5 Others 348
11.3.2 Printing Papers 349
11.3.3 Tatoo Papers 351
11.3.4 Fiber Textiles 352
11.3.5 Others 354
11.4 Application 355
11.4.1 Wearable sensors/biosensors 356
11.4.2 Non-invasive biofuel cells 359
11.4.3 Wearable energy storage devices 362
11.5 Prospects 366
Reference 367

12 FLEXIBLE & WEARABLE ELECTRONICS: FROM LAB TO FAB,
12.1 Introduction 375
12.2 Materials 376
12.2.1 Substrates 376
12.2.2 Functional materials 377
12.3 Printing technologies 378
12.3.1 Jet printing 378
12.3.1.1 Inkjet printing 378
12.3.1.2 Aerosol jet printing 380
12.3.1.3 Electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing 381
12.3.2 Screen printing 383
12.3.3 Other printing techniques 384
12.4. Flexible & wearable electronic products 385
12.4.1 Flexible force sensors 385
12.4.2 Paper battery 388
12.4.3 Flexible solar cell 390
12.4.4 Flexible display 394
12.5 Strategy towards smart clothing 396
12.6 Summary and perspective 398
Reference 398

13 MATERIALS AND PROCESSES FOR STRETCHABLE AND WEARABLE E-TEXTILE DEVICES,
13.1 Introduction 405
13.2 Materials for E-textiles 406
13.2.1 Conducting Materials 406
13.2.1.1 Metal Nanomaterials 406
13.2.1.2 Carbon Nanomaterials 407
13.2.1.3 Conducting Polymers 407
13.2.2 Passive Textile Materials 408
13.3 Device Applications 409
13.3.1 Interconnects and Electrodes 410
13.3.2 Strain Sensors 414
13.3.3 Heaters 418
13.3.4 Supercapacitors 419
13.3.5 Energy Generators 421
13.3.5.1 Thermoelectric Generators 422
13.3.5.2 Triboelectric Generators 424
13.4 Summary and Perspectives 426
References 428

Gang Wang is a Professor of materials science and engineering, at State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University (DHU) from the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning. He is a joint-Ph.D between Donghua University and Georgia Institute of Technology. From 2016-2019, he worked as postdoc at Northwestern University (USA) with Prof. Tobin J Marks and Prof. Antonio Facchetti. His current research interests include multiscale alignment of flexible semiconductor materials, shear print strategy and instruments, andtThe applications of electro-fibers in soft robotics and smart fabrics. He has been published first author/corresponding in international peer-reviewed journals such as PNAS, JACS,Nature Communications, Angewandte Chemie, Advanced Energy Materials, and ACS Nano in the past 3 years. He has 7 Chinese Invention Patents to his name, edited one book on soft electronics (Wiley-VCH), and served as organizer and invited speakers in ACS National Conferences amongst other things.

Chengyi Hou is Associate Professor of materials science and engineering, at State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University (DHU), under DHU Distinguished Young Professor Program. He received his Ph.D. degree at the department of materials science and engineering, Donghua University in 2014. He worked as a Marie Curie Postdoc at the department of chemistry, Technical University of Denmark from 2015 to 2017. He has engaged in the development of innovative methods and experimental approaches to address the key scientific and technical challenges related to scalable synthesis, processing, and assembly of nanomaterial-based soft electronics. He has explored the potential applications of a series of nanomaterials as electronic skin, micro-reactors, artificial muscle and three-dimensional biological scaffolds. He has published over 40 peer-review journal articles, with several publications on Science Advances, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Advanced Functional Materials, amongst others.

Hongzhi Wang is Professor of materials science and engineering, at State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University. He received his Ph.D in 1998 at Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. From 2000 to 2005, he worked as postdocr at Micro-space Chemistry Lab., National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan. In 2005, he joined Donghua University as a Full Professor . His main research topics are devoted to macroscopic-ordered 2D materials, flexible materials for wearable applications, functional fibers and textiles, and smart clothing. He has published over 200 papers in international peer-review journals, and granted over 80 patents, two of which have been commercialized in functional fiber industry in China.