John Wiley & Sons Hyperdocumentation Cover The term "hyperdocumentation" is a hyperbole that seems to characterize a paradox. The leading discu.. Product #: 978-1-78630-644-9 Regular price: $142.06 $142.06 In Stock

Hyperdocumentation

Le Deuff, Olivier

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1. Edition October 2021
288 Pages, Hardcover
Wiley & Sons Ltd

ISBN: 978-1-78630-644-9
John Wiley & Sons

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The term "hyperdocumentation" is a hyperbole that seems to characterize a paradox. The leading discussions on this topic bring in diverse ideas such as that of data, the fantasy of Big Data, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, algorithmic processing, the flow of information and the outstanding successes of disinformation.

The purpose of this book is to show that the current context of documentation is just another step in human construction that has been ongoing for not centuries but millennia and which, since the end of the 19th century, has been accelerating. Coined by Paul Otlet in 1934 in his Traite de Documentation, "hyperdocumentation" refers to the concept of documentation that is constantly being expanded and extended in its functionalities and prerogatives.

While, according to Otlet, everything could potentially be documented in this way, increasingly we find that it is our lives that are being hyperdocumented. Hyperdocumentation manifests as an increase not only in the quantity of information that is processed but also in its scope, as information is progressively integrated across areas that were previously poorly documented or even undocumented.

Acknowledgements ix

Foreword xi
Michael BUCKLAND

Introduction xv

Chapter 1 Hyperdocumentation According to Paul Otlet 1

1.1 The different levels of hyper in hyperdocumentation 3

1.1.1 Hyperdocumentation as an extension 4

1.1.2 Hyperdocumentation as accumulation 10

1.1.3 Hyperdocumentation as an increase in documentary forms 12

1.2 Hyperdocumentation as reduction 13

1.3 Hyperdocumentation as hypertext 16

1.4 Hyperdocumentation as a new world order 18

1.4.1 A hyperdocumentation between utopia and dystopia 21

1.4.2 Between classification and synthesis 23

1.5 The ultimate perspective of the documentation 25

Chapter 2 Hyperdocumentation as a Triumph of Documentality 29

2.1 A documentary theory of humanity 30

2.1.1 A philosophical theory of humanity 30

2.1.2 Homo documentator 31

2.2 Documentality or social ontology 32

2.3 Documentality and memory 35

2.4 Documentation and authority 37

2.5 A hyperdocumentary era 39

2.6 A document theory 41

Chapter 3 Hyperhuman or Hypermachine? 45

3.1 Desiring machines? 47

3.2 Typology of hyperdocumentary machines 50

3.3 Towards hyperdocumentality? 57

Chapter 4 Towards Hyperdocumentary Regimes 59

4.1 The documentary regime of Otlet's time 60

4.2 Changes in documentary regimes 67

4.2.1 Between memory and knowledge carriers 68

4.2.2 Hypermediation 69

4.2.3 Probability regimes 71

4.2.4 Regimes of confession and conversion 72

4.2.5 Regimes of monumentality 74

4.3 Post-Otlet documentation regimes 78

Chapter 5 Between Knowledge Indexing and Existence Indexing 85

5.1 An index question 87

5.2 The two faces of indexing 90

5.3 The need for an indexing ethic 92

5.4 A long history of indexing 95

5.4.1 Tension among those involved in documentation 97

5.5 Between documentarity and monumentality 102

5.6 Which indexation regime? 104

5.7 Should we stop indexing? 105

Chapter 6 Personal Documentation: Between "The Self" and "Myself" 111

6.1 Renewal of personal documentary practices 115

6.2 Self-documentation 118

6.3 Self-demonstration or self-documentation 122

6.4 Documentary freedom under constraints 128

6.5 Hypodocumentation or the concept of sousveillance 132

Chapter 7 The Hyperdocumentalists of Our Lives 135

7.1 The hyperdocumentalists of self 138

7.2 From the found friend to the "caring" lover 141

7.3 Computing centers or archive centers 143

7.4 Post-mortem hyperdocumentation 147

7.5 Post-human hyperdocumentation? 149

Chapter 8 Documentation of All the Senses 155

8.1 Hyperdocumentation as documentation of all the senses 155

8.2 Beyond the senses? 158

8.3 Paranormal hyperdocumentation 162

8.3.1 The hyperdocumentation of the sixth sense 162

8.3.2 Charles Fort 167

8.4 Political meaning? 169

8.5 Indexation of desires 173

Chapter 9 Free (or Open?) Hyperdocumentation 177

9.1 Which hyperdocumentary forms are "open"? 178

9.2 Documentation as resistance 181

9.3 Hyperleaks? 184

9.4 Hyperdocumentary convergence: the OSINT 186

9.5 Utopia or dystopia? 188

Chapter 10 Conclusion: Is it Necessary to Go to San Junipero? 191

10.1 A continuous confrontation between ancient and modern? 192

10.2 Between documents and monuments: Promethean vertigo 194

10.3 Towards an ethical hyperdocumentation, the challenge of moderation 196

10.4 Preserving the links, nexialism against hyperseparatism 197

Postface - Beyond Otlet: Fragmented Encyclopedism 201
Jean-Max NOYER

References 235

Index 247
Olivier Le Deuff is a lecturer in Information Science and Communication Studies at Bordeaux Montaigne University, France. He is the author of several books, essays and short stories, including Digital Humanities: History and Development, also published by ISTE-Wiley

O. Le Deuff, Université Bordeaux Montaigne, France