John Wiley & Sons Decolonising Geography? Disciplinary Histories and the End of the British Empire in Africa, 1948-1998 Cover How did a generation of academic geographers engage with constitutional decolonisation during the en.. Product #: 978-1-119-54928-4 Regular price: $69.07 $69.07 In Stock

Decolonising Geography? Disciplinary Histories and the End of the British Empire in Africa, 1948-1998

Craggs, Ruth / Neate, Hannah

RGS-IBG Book Series

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1. Edition November 2023
288 Pages, Hardcover
Wiley & Sons Ltd

ISBN: 978-1-119-54928-4
John Wiley & Sons

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How did a generation of academic geographers engage with constitutional decolonisation during the end of the British empire in Africa? In Decolonising Geography? Disciplinary Histories and the End of the British Empire in Africa, 1948-1990, Ruth Craggs and Hannah Neate explore how the teaching, research, administration and activism of geographers in Africa shaped the decolonisation and post-colonial geopolitics of the continent. With a biographical 'careering' approach, the authors follow the professional lives of individual geographers to provide fresh insights into decolonisation in the former British Empire in Africa, drawing from extensive archival research and more than 40 oral history interviews with geographers in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and the UK.

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DECOLONISING GEOGRAPHY?

"This book presents an extraordinarily sensitive account of geography's histories in five African countries subjected to British colonial rule. Craggs and Neate draw together political and imaginative processes of decolonisation, through an innovative biographical approach that humanizes and enlivens the story of our academic discipline. It will be an invaluable resource for those seeking a deeper understanding of decolonisation, its recent trajectories and far-reaching implications, on the African continent."
--Shari Daya, Affiliate Associate Professor in Environmental and Geographical Science, University of Cape Town

"By placing the experiences, ideas, and practices of African geographers in the center of their analyses, Craggs and Neate provide an unprecedented account of historical and contemporary decolonizing struggles within Geography and the academy. This book should be required reading for all those looking to decolonize the discipline and dislodge it from its Global North histories, institutions, and ideologies."
--Mona Domosh, Professor of Geography, The Joan P. and Edward J. Foley Jr. 1933 Professor, Dartmouth College

"This meticulous work explores how colonialism, decolonization and postcolonialism shaped African geography and geographers. It sheds light on efforts to 'Africanize' the discipline, a process which I was both witness to and a participant in."
--Stanley Okafor, Professor of Geography (Retired), University of Ibadan

How did a generation of academic geographers engage with constitutional decolonisation during the end of the British empire in Africa? In Decolonising Geography? Disciplinary Histories and the End of the British Empire in Africa, 1948-1998, Ruth Craggs and Hannah Neate explore how the teaching, research, administration and activism of geographers in Africa shaped the discipline and the post-colonial geopolitics of the continent. The authors follow the professional lives of individual geographers to provide fresh insights into decolonisation in the former British Empire in Africa, drawing from extensive archival research and more than 40 oral history interviews with geographers in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and the UK. Decolonising Geography is a must-read for any reader in the UK and Africa with an interest in the relationships between geography and decolonisation.

List of Figures and Table viii

Acknowledgements x

1. Decolonisation and Geography in Africa 1

Introduction 1

African Decolonisation 3

Periodisation 3

Decolonisation, Education, and the Place of African Universities 5

Contributions 10

Historicising Current Debates 10

Decolonising Geography's Histories 13

Professional Lives and Histories of Decolonisation 16

Biographical Methods 19

Sources 20

Case Studies 24

Structure 30

2. 'New, Interesting, and Even Exciting Opportunities': Geography and the Founding of Colonial Universities in Africa 42

Introduction 42

Asquith Colleges and the 'Imperial Family of Universities' 44

Geography at the Asquith Colleges: Colonial Networks 46

Early Faculty 47

Building a Department 54

Teaching and Researching Geography 58

Campus Relations 60

Conclusion 66

3. Shifting the Centre: Africanising Geography in Decolonisation 73

Introduction 73

African Geography Students in Britain 76

Shifting Higher Education Structures 82

Africanisation of Staff 89

Africanisation of Research, Curriculum, and Teaching 95

Conclusion 103

4. International Networks, Decolonisation, and the Cold War 110

Introduction 110

Diversifying Influences and Americanisation 113

Looking to America 113

American Orbits 115

The Quantitative Revolution in Africa 117

Other Eastern and Non-aligned Networks 121

Eastern Bloc Connections 121

Moving the Centre 122

Radical Geography and Underdevelopment 125

Conclusion 131

Mobility -- for Some 131

Decolonisation or Incorporation? 132

Innovation 134

5. Geography and National Development: Knowing, Planning, and Exploiting Resources for Independent Africa 142

Introduction 142

Geography and African Development 145

Producing Development Experts 146

Knowing New Nations (and Resources) through the Census 150

Research for Rural Development in Tanzania 154

BRALUP and Applied Research 154

Research for Ujamaa 156

Between Commitment and Critique 159

Regional Development Planning and New Urban Spaces in Nigeria 161

Rebalancing After War 161

Akin Mabogunje and the Geographer as Consultant 162

Conclusion 167

6. Geography, Apartheid and Anti-Apartheid Activism in South Africa 175

Introduction 175

Departmental Spaces, Geography and the Contestation of Apartheid 177

The Tearoom 178

Conference Spaces 179

contents vii

Teaching Spaces 180

Campus Politics and Activism 183

Campus Protests 183

Geographers as Activists Beyond Campus 187

Geographical Research and Apartheid 190

Research for (Separate) Development in South Africa 190

Apartheid: An Absent Subject 192

Growing Critique 195

People's Geography 196

Decolonising South African Geography 198

Working for Transformation 200

Challenging Geography's White Institutions 200

Consultancy and Critique 205

Conclusion 207

7. Legacies of Decolonisation in African and British Geography 217

Introduction 217

Leaving Africa 219

Pastures New 219

Reluctance and Compulsion 221

Isolation and Creativity 225

Growing Isolation 225

Solidarity and Creativity 228

Legacies in the UK 229

Textbook Africa 230

Area Studies, Development Studies, and Development Geography 232

African Connections, Colonial Nostalgia 235

Conclusion 241

8. Decolonising Geography Past and Present? 250

Introduction 250

Decolonisation, its Histories and Geographies 250

Peopling the Historiography of Decolonisation 250

Decolonising Geography's Histories 251

Learning from the Past 253

To What Extent was Geography Decolonised in the period 1948--1998? 253

What Does This Mean for Decolonisation Struggles Today? 257

Conclusion 264

Index 269
RUTH CRAGGS is Reader in Political and Historical Geography at King's College London.

At the time of writing HANNAH NEATE was Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at Manchester Metropolitan University.

R. Craggs, King's College London, UK; H. Neate, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK