John Wiley & Sons From an Other to the other, Book XVI Cover Sollers once wrote that, to him, Claudel was first and foremost the man who wrote, "Paradise is arou.. Product #: 978-1-5095-1005-4 Regular price: $34.49 $34.49 In Stock

From an Other to the other, Book XVI

Lacan, Jacques

Translated by Fink, Bruce

Cover

1. Edition October 2023
400 Pages, Hardcover
General Reading

ISBN: 978-1-5095-1005-4
John Wiley & Sons

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Sollers once wrote that, to him, Claudel was first and foremost the man who wrote, "Paradise is around us at this very moment, all its forests attentive like a great orchestra that invisibly adores and implores. The whole invention of the Universe with its notes falling vertiginously one by one into the abyss where the wonders of our dimensions are written."
Well, Lacan is, to me, the one who says in this Seminar, "We are all familiar with hell, it is everyday life."
Is that the same thing? No, I don't think so. Here there is no adoration, no invisible orchestra, no vertigo or wonders. Let us begin by the end: Lacan "evacuated" from the rue d'Ulm along with his audience, not without resistance or an uproar. The episode was in all the papers. What had he done to deserve such a fate? He had spoken not only to psychoanalysts, but also to young people who were still fired up by the events of May 1968, who nevertheless accepted him as a master of discourse at the same time as they dreamt of subverting the university system. What did he tell them? That "Revolution" means returning to the same place. That knowledge now imposes its law on power and has become uncontrollable. That thought is censorship itself. He spoke to them about Marx, but also about Pascal's wager--which became in his hands a new version of the master/slave dialectic--not to mention the foundations of set theory. He moved on to a discussion of perversion, and models of hysteria and obsession. All of that is connected, scintillates, and captivates.
Between the lines, the dialogue between Lacan and himself continues regarding the subject of jouissance and the relationship between jouissance and speech and language.

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Sollers once wrote that, to him, Claudel was first and foremost the man who wrote, "Paradise is around us at this very moment, all its forests attentive like a great orchestra that invisibly adores and implores. The whole invention of the Universe with its notes falling vertiginously one by one into the abyss where the wonders of our dimensions are written."
Well, Lacan is, to me, the one who says in this Seminar, "We are all familiar with hell, it is everyday life."
Is that the same thing? No, I don't think so. Here there is no adoration, no invisible orchestra, no vertigo or wonders. Let us begin by the end: Lacan "evacuated" from the rue d'Ulm along with his audience, not without resistance or an uproar. The episode was in all the papers. What had he done to deserve such a fate? He had spoken not only to psychoanalysts, but also to young people who were still fired up by the events of May 1968, who nevertheless accepted him as a master of discourse at the same time as they dreamt of subverting the university system. What did he tell them? That "Revolution" means returning to the same place. That knowledge now imposes its law on power and has become uncontrollable. That thought is censorship itself. He spoke to them about Marx, but also about Pascal's wager--which became in his hands a new version of the master/slave dialectic--not to mention the foundations of set theory. He moved on to a discussion of perversion, and models of hysteria and obsession. All of that is connected, scintillates, and captivates.
Between the lines, the dialogue between Lacan and himself continues regarding the subject of jouissance and the relationship between jouissance and speech and language.

Figures

Translator's Note

INTRODUCTION

I. From Surplus Value to Surplus Jouissance

The Inconsistency of the Other

II. The Knowledge Market and Truth (on) Strike

III. Topology of the Other

IV. Facts and What is Said

V. "I Am What I Is"

VI. Toward a Practice of Logic in Psychoanalysis

On Pascal's Wager

VII. Introduction to Pascal's Wager

VIII. The One and Little a

IX. From Fibonacci to Pascal

X. The Three Matrices

XI. Truth's Retardation and the Administration of Knowledge

Jouissance: Its Field

XII. "The Freud Event"

XIII. On Jouissance Posited as an Absolute

XIV. The Two Sides of Sublimation

XV. High Fever

XVI. Structures of Perversion

Jouissance: Its Real

XVII. Thought (as) Censorship

XVIII. Inside Outside

XIX. Knowledge and Power

XX. Knowledge and Jouissance

XXI. Responses to Aporias

Jouissance: Its Logic

XXII. Paradoxes of Psychoanalytic Action

XXIII. How to Generate Surplus Jouissance Logically

XXIV. On the One-Extra

Evacuation

XXV. The Ravishing Ignominy of the Hommelle

Appendices

Fibonacci as Used by Lacan, by Luc Miller

Reader's Guide, by Jacques-Alain Miller

Dossier on the Evacuation

Index
Jacques Lacan (1901-1981) was one of the twentieth century's most influential thinkers. His many works include Écrits, The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psycho-analysis and the many volumes of The Seminar.